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What To Expect After Your Childs Vaccinations


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Vaccinations will protect your child from many infectious diseases. All the diseases are serious, and many are life-threatening.

What side effects should I expect?

For almost every child, the benefits of immunization outweigh the risks, but as with every medicine there’s always a potential downside.

It’s very common to get swelling and redness at the injection site. A small, hard lump can also appear, but this should go down on its own after a while. If your child gets a reaction that’s worse than this, talk to your doctor or health visitor.

Sometimes a child develops a fever of over 37.5°c. In this case, it is important to keep your child cool by making sure they aren’t wearing too many layers and by keeping them hydrated with cool drinks. If your child appears uncomfortable and unwell then you can give the recommended dose of infant paracetamol or ibuprofen liquid. Remember, never give aspirin to anyone under the age of 16.

What should I expect with the MMR vaccine?

The MMR vaccine is made up three different vaccines: measles, mumps and rubella. These different components can cause different reactions at different times.

After six to ten days the measles vaccine may cause a fever, measles like rash and a loss of appetite. Then, twelve to fourteen days after the vaccine, you could get a fleeting rash and a raised temperature. This is the rubella vaccine starting to work. Then lastly, after two to three weeks the mumps vaccine may cause symptoms like a swollen or tender jaw and a low-grade fever.

These symptoms usually disappear on their own, and are usually nothing to worry about. They’re more likely after the first dose of MMR, because they only happen when a child has no antibodies to the diseases already. So there is a grain of truth in the old wives tale that a reaction to a vaccine means you really needed it.

What are some vaccination tips

When getting your child vaccinated it helps wear the right clothing. This can save time and effort at the GP surgery. Choose clothes that can be removed or rolled up easily to avoid tears or tantrums. Also make sure that you yourself remain calm. A child can sense any restlessness or anxiety.

After the jab, you may want to give a breastfeed, offer a dummy, or just hug your baby. Make sure the nurse records the type of injections and where each was given in your child’s red book. Remember, if a relative or carer is taking your child to get vaccinated then you will need a permission letter signed by you or someone else with parental responsibility.

References

http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/vaccinations/Pages/Appointments.aspx

http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/vaccinations/Pages/Appointments.aspx

10864 Published November 2012

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